Thursday, 13 June 2024 00:00

Understanding Custom Orthotics

Custom orthotics are specialized medical devices designed to support and comfort your feet. Crafted uniquely for your foot's contours, they are inserted into shoes to correct biomechanical foot issues such as problems with walking, standing, or running. These devices work by aligning the foot and ankle into the most anatomically efficient position, redistributing weight to relieve pressure points, and providing support precisely where it is needed. Custom orthotics are beneficial for people with flat feet, high arches, plantar fasciitis, and heel spurs, and for those who experience foot pain due to medical conditions like diabetes or arthritis. They are also advantageous for individuals whose daily activities put excessive stress on their feet, such as athletes or those with physically demanding jobs. If you are considering custom orthotics, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can assess your specific needs and provide a prescription tailored to your foot's unique structure and the issues you are experiencing.

Experience a transformative solution to heel pain and foot pain through the personalized benefits of custom orthotics and shoe inserts. If you’re grappling with the persistent agony of plantar fasciitis, these customized inserts are designed to alleviate the strain on the plantar fascia, providing targeted relief. Engineered to adapt to your unique foot anatomy, custom orthotics tackle not only plantar fasciitis but also general foot and heel pain, offering unparalleled support and comfort. Don’t let every step be a reminder of discomfort; step into a world of tailored well-being. Say farewell to the limitations imposed by heel pain and embrace the freedom of pain-free mobility. Invest in your foot health and redefine your daily stride with the transformative power of custom orthotics and shoe inserts, ensuring each step is a step towards lasting comfort. 

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Issaquah, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Investing in Custom Orthotics Means Investing in Foot Health

Custom orthotics offer a tailored approach to foot health, providing a host of benefits that extend far beyond conventional shoe inserts. One of the primary advantages lies in their ability to address specific biomechanical issues. Unlike off-the-shelf inserts, custom orthotics are crafted based on an individual's unique foot structure, gait, and any existing foot conditions.

The personalized design of custom orthotics ensures optimal support for the arches, promoting proper alignment and distributing pressure evenly across the feet. This can be particularly beneficial for individuals dealing with issues such as overpronation or underpronation, as custom orthotics help correct imbalances that may lead to discomfort or injury.

Beyond biomechanics, custom orthotics can alleviate a range of foot problems, including plantar fasciitis, bunions, and metatarsalgia. They provide targeted relief to areas under stress, reducing pain and inflammation. Additionally, for those with specific medical conditions like diabetes, custom orthotics can play a crucial role in preventing complications associated with poor foot health.

Comfort is another key aspect of custom orthotics. By accommodating the unique contours of an individual's feet, these inserts enhance overall comfort, making daily activities more enjoyable. Whether for athletes looking to optimize performance or individuals seeking relief from chronic foot pain, custom orthotics offer a versatile solution.

Investing in custom orthotics is an investment in long-term foot health. They not only provide immediate relief but also contribute to the prevention of future issues. With the ability to seamlessly integrate into various types of footwear, custom orthotics empower individuals to prioritize foot comfort without compromising on style. In essence, custom orthotics are a personalized prescription for happy, healthy, and pain-free feet.


 

Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

What Can Be Done About Broken Toes

Toe fractures can occur due to various reasons, such as stubbing, dropping heavy objects, or even sports injuries. The impact can cause the toe bone to break, leading to pain, swelling, and difficulty in walking. Individuals may experience tenderness, bruising, and sometimes even a visible deformity depending on the severity of the fracture. To evaluate toe fractures, podiatrists may perform physical examinations and order X-rays to determine the type and severity of the break. Treatment options range from simple rest and elevation to immobilization using splints, buddy taping, or wearing a special shoe. In severe cases or for fractures that involve displaced bones, surgery may be necessary to realign and stabilize the bones. If you have a broken toe, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for treatment to facilitate optimal healing and prevent complications. 

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact the podiatrists from Issaquah Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Issaquah, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

What to Know About a Broken Toe

The forefoot is composed of five metatarsal bones and fourteen phalanges. Each toe has three phalanges except for the big toe which only has two. Our toes play an essential role to the walking process, which is why a broken toe could seriously disrupt one’s ability to move around. Toe fractures are common and can be very painful. Fortunately, these injuries rarely require surgery and usually heal with rest and a change in activity.

Broken toes typically result from a traumatic event such as falling, stubbing the toe, or dropping something on the toe. Traumatic toe fractures may be categorized as either minor or severe fractures. At times, one may hear a “pop” or “crack” sound when the bone breaks. Common symptoms of a traumatic toe fracture include pain, throbbing, bruising, swelling, and redness.

Another type of toe fractures is a stress fracture. These injuries usually appear in the form of small hairline breaks on the bone. Stress fractures develop after repetitive activity instead of a single injury. Stress fractures occur when the muscles in the bone become too weak to absorb impact. Consequently, the toe bone becomes vulnerable to any pressure and impact it endures. Symptoms for a stress fracture in the toe include swelling without bruising, tenderness to the touch, pain that goes away with rest, and pain after walking or running.

If you suspect that you have a broken toe, you should make an appointment with your podiatrist. He or she will likely diagnose you by performing a physical exam and an X-ray. Treatment for a broken toe may include the R.I.C.E. method, buddy taping, surgery, or antibiotics. The R.I.C.E. method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a common treatment method for many injuries because it decreases pain. Buddy tapping involves wrapping the injured toe next to an adjacent toe to keep it supported and protected. These two methods have proven to be effective in the healing process for toe fractures. The estimated healing time for a broken toe is approximately four to six weeks. If the injury becomes infected or requires surgery, the estimated healing time may take eight weeks or more. 

For basketball players, the Achilles tendon stands as a vital yet vulnerable component of their anatomy, often susceptible to injury due to the demands of the sport. The explosive movements, sudden changes in direction, and repetitive jumping place significant stress on this tendon, increasing the risk of strain or rupture. To prevent such injuries, athletes must prioritize proper conditioning and strengthening exercises, focusing on calf muscles and Achilles tendon flexibility. Incorporating dynamic warm-up routines and gradual progression in training intensity can also lower the risk of tendon overuse. Footwear plays a pivotal role, with supportive basketball shoes providing stability and shock absorption to lessen the strain on the Achilles tendon. Maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition aids in tissue health and recovery, further reducing the likelihood of tendon injuries. If you are a basketball athlete or a weekend warrior and have endured an Achilles tendon injury, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can determine the right treatment for you.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact the podiatrists of Issaquah Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Issaquah, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about The Causes, Types, and Treatments of Achilles Tendon Injuries

Tendons are fibrous tissues that connect muscles with bone. The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscles at the back of the leg with the heel, and facilitates movements such as jumping, running, and walking. 

Because the Achilles tendon is engaged so frequently and bears a great deal of pressure and stress throughout the day, it can become injured. Achilles tendon injuries cause the tissue to become irritated, inflamed, and swollen. Pain can come on gradually or be immediate, and will vary from mild to severe depending upon the injury. Where the pain occurs will vary as well, from just above the heel up through the back of the leg. There may also be stiffness in the tendon.

Achilles tendon injuries can often be caused by repetitive stress. They may also occur while running, playing tennis, gymnastics, football, basketball, dancing, soccer, baseball or other sports that require speeding up, slowing down, or pivoting quickly. Wearing high heels, falling from an elevation, stepping in a hole, having flat feet, bone spurs, tight leg muscles or tendons, wearing improper athletic shoes, exercising on uneven surfaces, or starting a new type of exercise can also cause Achilles tendon injuries.

The two most common Achilles tendon injuries are tendonitis and rupturesTendonitis causes painful inflammation and can occur in different parts of the tendon. Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs when the fibers in middle of the tendon begin to break down, thicken, and swell. This condition typically affects younger, more active adults. Insertional Achilles tendonitis occurs where the tendon inserts into the heel bone. It is common for bone spurs to form with this type of injury. This condition can affect people of any age and level of activity.

Achilles tendon ruptures are a tear in the tendon. These breaks may be partial or complete. There may be an audible popping noise at the moment of injury and the pain will be sudden and severe.

An Achilles tendon injury can be diagnosed by your podiatrist after they examine you, check your range of motion, and possibly perform a calf squeeze test or review an X-ray or MRI. Depending on the type and severity of your injury, your podiatrist may treat your condition with rest/ice/compression/elevation (RICE), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, heel lifts, and stretching and strengthening exercises. If you have torn your Achilles tendon, treatment may include physical therapy, ultrasound, shockwave therapy, or possibly even surgery.


 

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Toenail fungus, medically termed onychomycosis, is a fungal infection that commonly affects the toenails. It is typically caused by dermatophytes, which are fungi that thrive in warm and moist environments like sweaty shoes or public swimming pools. When these fungi invade the toenail bed, they can cause discoloration, thickening, and crumbling of the nail. Symptoms may include yellowing or darkening of the nail, a distorted shape, and a foul odor. Certain factors increase the risk of developing toenail fungus. Among them are age, poor circulation, weakened immune system, and frequent exposure to moist environments. Common types of fungal infections include distal subungual onychomycosis, white superficial onychomycosis, proximal subungual onychomycosis, and candida onychomycosis. Treatment typically involves prescribed antifungal medications, either topical or oral, depending on the severity of the infection. In severe cases, surgical removal of the nail may be necessary. If you think you have toenail fungus, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment at your earliest convenience.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with the podiatrists from Issaquah Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Issaquah, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about How to Deal with Athlete's Foot
Tuesday, 28 May 2024 00:00

How to Deal with Athlete's Foot

Athlete’s foot is a type of fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet. It is caused when the tinea fungus grows on the foot. It is possible to catch the fungus through direct contact with someone who has it or by touching a surface that is contaminated with it. This type of fungus thrives in warm, moist environments such as showers, locker room floors, and swimming pools. Your risk of getting it may also increase by wearing tight-fitting, closed-toe shoes, or by having sweaty feet.

Symptoms of athlete’s foot include itching, stinging or burning sensations between the toes. You may also experience toenails that are discolored, thick, crumbly, or toenails that pull away from the nail bed.

Your podiatrist may diagnose athlete’s foot by detecting these symptoms or by doing a skin test to see if there is a fungal infection present. The most common exam used to detect Athlete’s foot is a skin lesion potassium hydroxide exam. To use this method, your doctor will scrape off a small area of the infected skin and place it into potassium hydroxide. The potassium hydroxide will destroy the normal cells and leave the fungal cells untouched so that they are visible under a microscope.

There are a variety of treatment options for athlete’s foot. Some medications are miconazole (Desenex), terbinafine (Lamisil AT), clotrimazole (Lotrimin AF), butenafine (Lotrimin Ultra), and tolnaftate (Tinactin). While these options may be able to treat your fungus, it is best that you consult with a podiatrist in order to see which treatment option may work best for you.

In some cases, Athlete’s foot may lead to complications. A severe complication would be a secondary bacterial infection which may cause your foot to become swollen, painful, and hot.

There are ways that you can prevent athlete’s foot. Washing your feet with soap and water each day and drying them thoroughly is an effective way to prevent infections. You also shouldn’t share socks, shoes, or towels with other people. It is crucial that you wear shower sandals in public showers, around swimming pools, and in other public places. Additionally, you should make sure you wear shoes that can breathe and change your socks when your feet become sweaty. If you suspect that you have Athlete’s foot, you should seek help from a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Distance running, a popular form of exercise and competition, can place significant stress on the feet and ankles, leading to various injuries. One common reason is overuse, as the repetitive pounding of the feet against hard surfaces can strain muscles, tendons, and ligaments over time. Improper footwear or worn-out running shoes lacking adequate support or cushioning can increase the risk of injury. Additionally, biomechanical factors, such as overpronation or supination, where the foot rolls inward or outward excessively during the running gait, can contribute to instability and strain on the ankles. Running on uneven terrain or hard surfaces without proper shock absorption can also heighten the risk of foot and ankle injuries. Furthermore, sudden increases in training volume or intensity without proper conditioning and recovery can overload the lower extremities, predisposing runners to injuries. Foot and ankle injuries are common in people who enjoy running. If this applies to you, it is suggested that you contact a podiatrist who can offer correct treatment methods, in addition to effective injury prevention techniques.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact the podiatrists of Issaquah Foot & Ankle Specialists. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Issaquah, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot And Ankle Injuries
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